Kinghorn’s unique eco cemetery plans with views to die for!

Kinghorn’s unique eco cemetery plans with views to die for!
Fife Today, by Tanya Scoon 
01.11.16

 

With its picturesque lochside setting and stunning scenery it’s an idyllic setting for a final resting place. And the piece of land on the eastern bank of Kinghorn loch could be just that if exciting plans for an eco cemetery complete with Lord of the Rings-style columbarium – a grassy mound in which people’s ashes can be placed – are given the go-ahead by Fife Council planners.

 

The site earmarked for the eco cemetery, which would be run as a social enterprise and the first of its kind in the UK, is owned by Kinghorn Community Land Association (KCLA) which owns various small plots of land in and around the town for the benefit of the local community. 

 

And, with burial space running out in the traditional cemeteries the project, which is being championed by KCLA working with Edinburgh-based architects Simpson and Brown at a site just behind the new Ecology Centre, is being given a positive response from local people. 

 

Two public information sessions held at the Ecology Centre last weekend and Kinghorn Community Centre on Tuesday, brought an almost unanimous positive response. The plans include both traditional and eco burial areas on a site which has been planned around the natural contours of the land on which it sits, making the most of its stunning features.

 

It would incorporate a four-chamber columbarium, similar in appearance to an Iron Age barrow – a hollow grass-covered mound with passages and curved chambers with 400 recessed niches in the walls in which ashes could be sealed and candles placed. These will include family vaults which people can buy at a reasonable cost to cover the facility’s running costs, and all money raised will be put back into the running, maintenance and management costs of the cemetery. 

 

As many natural and recyclable materials as possible would be used in the building of the structures. And, as well as the burial areas and vaults it would include a covered but open seating area, sculptures, a memorial garden, reflection pond and viewpoint with an outlook over the Bass Rock and beyond.

 

It would incorporate a four-chamber columbarium, similar in appearance to an Iron Age barrow – a hollow grass-covered mound with passages and curved chambers with 400 recessed niches in the walls in which ashes could be sealed and candles placed. These will include family vaults which people can buy at a reasonable cost to cover the facility’s running costs, and all money raised will be put back into the running, maintenance and management costs of the cemetery. 

 

As many natural and recyclable materials as possible would be used in the building of the structures. And, as well as the burial areas and vaults it would include a covered but open seating area, sculptures, a memorial garden, reflection pond and viewpoint with an outlook over the Bass Rock and beyond.